Rosie Huntington-Whiteley: Manifestation

Gallic Passion, American Charm and the British Supermodel Star in a Sun-Kissed Fashion Short from Guy Aroch

A sun-drenched Malibu Beach sets the scene for Manifestation, a playful short from fashion photographer and filmmaker Guy Aroch. Scripted by System magazine’s Jonathan Wingfield, the story sees an American and a Frenchman in a heated discussion about the pitfalls of summer in Paris—the latter finds a welcome distraction, however, in the seductive gaze of supermodel Rosie Huntington-Whiteley. As the face of Burberry, Victoria’s Secret and Loewe, the British-born beauty turns heads before diving into the Californian ocean, a far cry from her rural family home on a Devonshire farm. “I guess the film has elements of sex, humor and cliché,” says the Israel-born, New York-based Aroch, who met the model and actor earlier this year while working together on a shoot for Muse magazine. “But the point is to show how important it is to see the positive and goodness that life can bring. It’s a glass-half-full kind of message.”

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Conversations (2)

  • pomoBoho
    what was this shot on?
  • Franco De Rose
    Funny- even in America, the french find a way to complain about everything and always! But Paris at anytime is fabulous

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  • On Replay
    On Replay

    The Future Catwalk

    Mirte Maas Walks an Infinite Runway in Barnaby Roper's New Interactive Story

    Your keystrokes guide Mirte Maas’ epic strides through a series of psychedelic landscapes in Barnaby Roper’s user-controlled fashion experience. As the Dutch model marches, new digital sound, image and effects create 26 distinct and immersive environments, from a high-definition forest and a space-age desert landscape to kaleidoscopic moving collages. Each one corresponds to its own letter on your laptop or desktop keyboard, while mobile device users can enjoy the journey in a specially tailored short film. The innovative piece marks a new level of complexity for the New Yorkbased director, whose previous experiment on NOWNESS saw model Iris Strubegger multiply on screen as visitors’ commands combined to form a dark visual symphony. To create the mesmerizingly addictive Mirte, Future Catwalk, Roper collaborated with Tristan Bechet to compose a hypnotic, driving score that morphs to keep time to Maas’ motion. The model kept a steady pace on a treadmill for the better part of two shooting days, wearing boots by Rick Owens paired with pieces from Givenchy and Christopher Kane by stylist Tony Irvine. “I like the playfulness and the air of discovery; I like that the viewer has the choice and that I am not dictating to them how they should view it,” says Roper. “Most of all, I like the possibilities of where interactivity could and will go in the future.”

    STATS FROM THE SET

    Time spent shooting: 

    2 days.


    Time spent on treadmill: 

    10 hours.

     

    Number of outfit changes: 

    6.

     

    Time spent in post-production: 

    2 months.


    Number of programmers: 

    2. 


    Lines of code: 

    400.

     

    Keyboard letter with fewest steps: 

    N (1.8).


    Keyboard letter with most steps: 

    S (hundreds).


    Total steps visible (excluding “S”): 

    779.8.


    Credits: 1. Leather dress by Givenchy, skirt by Ann Demeulemeester, top and boots by Rick Owens, cape by Araks; 2. Coat, dress and boots by Rick Owens; 3. Leather dress by Givenchy, hooded top by Ann Demeulemeester; 4. Hat and mask by Rick Owens; 5. Top, dress and boots by Rick Owens; 6. Dress and boots by Rick Owens
    (Read More)
  • MOST SHARED IN BEAUTY
    MOST SHARED IN BEAUTY

    Lily Donaldson’s Flying Hair

    A Slow-mo Session with Sam McKnight

    Internationally renowned hairstylist Sam McKnight teases out the unseen calm in two seconds of a thrashing blonde mane in this slow-motion film shot by photographer Matthew Donaldson. As his model daughter Lily spins 360 degrees, her hair buffeted by four wind machines, Donaldson stretches two seconds into two hypnotic minutes, capturing every exquisite movement at 1,000 frames per second. In a world where technology is increasingly maligned for encouraging us to hide from reality, there is a welcome irony here: Using the super-high definition Phantom Gold HD—a camera initially developed for monitoring missile flights—Donaldson distills a hyper-real tranquility. The film is also a paean to Ara Gallant, one of the great session hairdressers of the 1960s and the inventor of the “flying hair” technique. “I love using wind on hair, and I love anything to do with the outdoors—like windy beaches and mountains,” McKnight says. Not that nature is required for coveted bouncy locks. “The two girls who could move their hair without any wind machines were Linda Evangelista and Yasmin Le Bon,” he reminisces. “They were legendary for the ability to shake their hair even slightly and it could fill two pages.” Working with make-up artist Val Garland and a suitably dreamy soundtrack by Zero 7, McKnight and Donaldson have created a film with a poignant message: Life may be ephemeral and precious—but isn’t it beautiful?
    (Read More)

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