beauty

Close-ups on the industry’s fresh faces, bold iconoclasts and distinguished créateurs

Latest In beauty

June 3, 2014

Beyond the Skin

Jonas Åkerlund Takes Model Shaun Ross on a Hyperkinetic Trip Through LA in the Final #DefineBeauty Film

“Hollywood is so good at only seeing what’s on the outside, and using that first impression instead of going deeper,” says Jonas Åkerlund of the location of the final film in the #DefineBeauty series, in which he follows American model and actor Shaun Ross around the back streets and freeways of Los Angeles. “I think Shaun has spent all his life with those reactions. Look again and you see that this guy is really beautiful.” The Swedish filmmaker is known for music videos that span over 25 years—from Madonna to Beyonce, Iggy Pop to U2—and feature films including the darkly comic 2002 release, Spun. His gothic style is apparent in today’s portrait of the famed albino model, who recently starred in Lana Del Rey’s 30 minute film, Tropico. “When Shaun showed up on Hollywood Boulevard, Darth Vader and Mickey Mouse were affronted,” the filmmaker says of filming Ross, who was styled by his wife B. Åkerlund. “Like, ‘What the fuck is this guy doing here?’” Elements of Beyond the Skin were shot by Ross himself with a camera provided by the director, whose cat was given a supporting role. “She’s also albino so I thought they might have a connection,” says Åkerlund. “They actually did. She wouldn't stop sitting on his head.”

Look one: Top & skirt by Yuima Nakazato.
Look two: Head piece by Maiko Takeda, cape & pants by Yuima Nakazato, shoes by Nereku.
Look three: Leather jacket by Bohemian Society, metal mesh top & bracelets by Michael Schmidt Studios, boots by Gasoline Glamour.
Look four: Jacket by, Hyein Seo, top & shorts by Yuima Nakazato, shoes by Nereku.

(Read More)

SUBSCRIBE TO beauty
ON NOWNESS

MORE TO LOVE IN beauty

Refresh

Spotlight

Bob Recine: Alchemy of Beauty

The Celebrated Hairstylist Reflects on the Aspirations Guiding His Artistry

Visionary hairstylist and artist Bob Recine sits down with filmmaker Alison Chernick in his New York studio to reflect on his friendship with Andy Warhol, the eternal quest for beauty, and collaborating with Lady Gaga on a room made entirely out of hair for one of Barneys window displays last Christmas. Growing up as part of New York’s rebellious 1970s punk scene, Recine took an early interest in urban art and music, building a vast portfolio and playing in multiple bands before translating his creative pursuits into hairdressing. Known today for his exquisite styling and sculptural coiffures, Recine has made bold statements on runways and in campaigns for the likes of Chloé, Kenzo and Jil Sander. “He is on a quest to find that transient moment of beauty,” says Chernick, likening Recine to the groundbreaking El Bulli chef Ferran Adrià. “His work transforms the medium from which it was born.” From Annie Leibovitz and Mario Testino to Irving Penn and Helmut Newton, Recine has collaborated with every major photographer, and his 'dos have graced covers of most leading fashion publications, including Wi-DVHarper’s Bazaar, and every global edition of Vogue. This month, the highlights of the industry legend’s lengthy career in hairstyling, art and sculpture—including a human figure made from 60lbs of hairpins—are gathered in Freedman/Damiani's new book, Bob Recine: Alchemy of Beauty.

(Read More)

Spotlight

Ryan McGinley: Entrance Romance

Carolyn Murphy Lights Up the Photographer's Daringly Spiritual New Film

“I knew it was going to be wild when I signed on,” says Carolyn Murphy, who stars in Ryan McGinley’s exclusive short film Entrance Romance (it felt like a kiss). “Next thing I know, my manager is telling me that they're going to break glass on my head and my leading man's a dog. I'm like, 'That's it?' I was so sure I'd have to take my clothes off,” she says, laughing. Shot with a Phantom camera (capable of capturing video at over 1000 frames per second), Entrance Romance sees the all-American beauty (since 2002 the face of Estée Lauder) cheerfully turning a can of WD-40 into a flame thrower, passionately kissing a dog and smiling serenely as a bowl of goldfish smashes over her head. Murphy notes: "We did the fishbowl scene in just one take. As soon as it cracked against my head, everyone dove down and scrambled to pick up the goldfish. None were hurt in the making of this film!" The film's collision of innocence and thrill should be familiar to fans of the photographer's previous work—carefree, hazy shots of teenagers jumping off cliffs, skinny dipping or cavorting in remote locations (earlier this year, McGinley debuted a film for Pringle of Scotland featuring Tilda Swinton in a forest and caves)—but here the action is exquisitely drawn out, with the camera registering the most minute changes in Murphy's expression. Despite the relentless focus, her face remains unflinchingly calm, emphasized by beachy makeup, luminous golden lighting, and a meditative, chant-led soundtrack, all of which provide an intriguing contrast to the film’s explosions of glass shards. “We thought about going with a really rough punk rock look,” makeup artist James Kaliardos says. “But Ryan loved the idea of showing this iconic, fresh-faced California girl in an entirely new context, so I did fresh, 70s “no-makeup” makeup. We wanted her to look happy and in control, but still vulnerable.” So she does—and her bliss is infectious. 


(Read More)

Previously In beauty

View Full beauty Archive

LOAD MORE
请扫描二维码,关注NOWNESS官方微信!
WeChat

或直接添加NOWNESS官方微信账号:
NOWNESS_OFFICIAL

3777